Minneapolis Cops Ask For Help After Body Parts Discovered In 2 Locations


Crime scene in the woods

Photo: Getty Images

Authorities in Minneapolis are investigating a grisly murder, where the suspect dumped the body parts of their victim in at least two locations. Investigators believe the victim is a white male in his 30s but have not identified him.

Minneapolis police spokesman John Elder said that a passerby noticed the first set of body parts around 9:30 a.m. on Thursday (June 17). Reporters for KMSP arrived while police were canvassing the scene and saw a partially covered leg that was cut to pieces. While investigators were at the scene, local residents found another bag containing body parts.

Cadaver dogs were brought to the scene to try to locate the remaining body parts but did not find anything.

"Officers are working with the medical examiner and the MPD crime laboratory to get these items retrieved, get them packaged and down to the medical examiner's office where they will work in conjunction with our homicide unit to be able to identify who this person may be," Elder said. "The body parts that were found would lead us to believe that the injuries caused by the removal would not be life-sustaining. These would be life-ending injuries."

Elder said that the body parts appeared to be fresh and that officials do not believe it was a random act of violence. He asked the public to be vigilant and contact the police with any information they may have. He said officials are scouring missing person reports, hoping to determine the identity of the victim.

The shocking discovery has left residents in the quiet neighborhood rattled.

"You can't make this stuff up. It's unreal," Austin Memaridis, who found the second bag of body parts and called 911, told KSTP. "This is a really nice neighborhood. It's really quiet."

"Is it domestic, is it someone known, is it sending a message?" Marshall Howell told the news station. "Because to me, it's someone wanting more attention, the fact that there are pieces in different areas."


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